Monday, April 25, 2011

Biodegradable Trash Bags Available for Aerobic and Anaerobic Landfills

Hello,

I live in Fairlington and the total number of plastic trash bags that are left on the curb for 6 days-a-week pickup from Fairlington's 3,500 households may be as many as 650,000 per year.

You can find biodegradable trash bags and kitchen bags advertised on the Web, the most biodegradable trash bags and kitchen bags seem to be constructed of starch and they biodegrade in both aerobic and anaerobic landfills. Check out the Web for details.

Using highly biodegradable trash bags is something we can do right now, we don't need permission from Dominion Resources or Washington Gas or the other fossil fuel polluters who are micro-managing Jay Fisette's Energy Task Force.

Susan

11 Comments:

At 25 April, 2011 , Anonymous Anonymous said...

The starch-baaed trash bags will biodegrade in anaerobic landfills. Most of the others won't.

 
At 25 April, 2011 , Anonymous anon. 22205 said...

If you talk to the people who operate the landfills, most trash bags are broken open while being buried.

 
At 25 April, 2011 , Anonymous Anonymous said...

You don't want to use polyethylene trash bags. Polyethylene is one of the most chemically inert substances ever invented.

 
At 26 April, 2011 , Anonymous Joan22207 said...

Alas, most supermarket single-use trash bags are made of polyethylene.

 
At 26 April, 2011 , Anonymous Anonymous said...

For $250,000 Arlington County could provide at least 500,000 reusable shopping bags to residents. Same way paper leaf bags are distributed.

 
At 26 April, 2011 , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I use the cotton reusable bags you can purchase at Trader Joes.

 
At 26 April, 2011 , Anonymous anon. Arlington Ridge said...

We can also heat water for outdoor swimming pools with inexpensive solar water heaters which are extensively used by Florida homeowners with pools.

 
At 26 April, 2011 , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Where is the so-called Civic Federation regarding these environmental issues?

 
At 26 April, 2011 , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Distributed Energy Systems. What an idiotic idea. Let's be like Baltimore. Burn trash in a big incinerator in downtown Arlington and use the steam to generate electricity and heat buildings. Nevermind that we can heat the buildings from on-site solar water heating and generate the electricity from wind farms and on-site photovoltaic panels.

 
At 26 April, 2011 , Anonymous terri said...

Jay Fisette, Barbara Favola, and Chris Zimmerman spent 10 years on the County Board rubber-stamping site plans for huge buildings with LEED scores of 20, 21, 23, 24.

Latest energy pig buildings they rubber-stamped approval for are the Artisphere, Aquatic Center, New Wakefield HS.

 
At 27 April, 2011 , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Worst energy pig of all? Washington and Lee High School.

 

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